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Top 5 Regrets of the Dying : #1. I wish I'd had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.

Chloë Rain

#1. I wish I'd had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me. 

"This was the most common regret of all. When people realise that their life is almost over and look back clearly on it, it is easy to see how many dreams have gone unfulfilled. Most people had not honoured even a half of their dreams and had to die knowing that it was due to choices they had made, or not made. Health brings a freedom very few realise, until they no longer have it."  

#2. I wish I hadn't worked so hard.

“This came from every male patient that I nursed. They missed their children’s youth and their partner’s companionship. Women also spoke of this regret, but as most were from an older generation, many of the female patients had not been breadwinners. All of the men I nursed deeply regretted spending so much of their lives on the treadmill of a work existence.”

#3. I wish I'd had the courage to express myself.

“Many people suppressed their feelings in order to keep peace with others. As a result, they settled for a mediocre existence and never became who they were truly capable of becoming. Many developed illnesses relating to the bitterness and resentment they carried as a result.”

#4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.

“Often they would not truly realise the full benefits of old friends until their dying weeks and it was not always possible to track them down. Many had become so caught up in their own lives that they had let golden friendships slip by over the years. There were many deep regrets about not giving friendships the time and effort that they deserved. Everyone misses their friends when they are dying.”

#5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.

”This is a surprisingly common one. Many did not realise until the end that happiness is a choice. They had stayed stuck in old patterns and habits. The so-called ‘comfort’ of familiarity overflowed into their emotions, as well as their physical lives. Fear of change had them pretending to others, and to themselves, that they were content, when deep within, they longed to laugh properly and have silliness in their life again.”

Author Bronnie Ware had been unfulfilled in her work for many years, seeking something that resonated with her soul she ended up in palliative care and after many years of caring for the dying she was inspired to write "Top 5 Regrets of the Dying" to share what so many people no matter what their background expressed they wished they'd done more of while they were healthy and alive.

palliative: (of a treatment or medicine) relieving pain or alleviating a problem without dealing with the underlying cause.

Are you ready to make the shift?

You may find yourself asking "Where do I start? How do I begin?" Begin with answering the call within, listening to the voice of your Inner Guidance. Fear of change is normal, but there are ways to learn to overcome your fears and start acting on the guidance within that will lead you to your happiest life and way of being in the world.

Connecting with our deeper desires, does not involve knowing the answers to all of our questions, because it's only in not knowing that we can be truly receptive and it's only in being receptive that we can truly discover, learn, and evolve. When we shift into wonder and curiosity, there is an opening to a deeper wisdom. Our feminine power, is a shift from the masculine energy where not knowing is a source of weakness and powerlessness, to feminine energy where wonder and curiosity are the ultimate source of power and strength. ‪

"Many did not realise until the end, that happiness is a choice."

Be a light unto yourself.” Ultimately, each of us must develop within ourselves the capacity to make our way through the darkness without any companions, maps or guide.
— Osho

Top 5 regrets of the dying: #1 “I wish I’d lived a life true to my dreams instead of doing what others expected of me." The end of my work days are so much more rewarding these days. I do not regret everything that has transpired to bring me to this place of Joy, Purpose, and Self Love. There is no more worthwhile journey than the one from your head to your heart. Once you get there, you know who you are. And that has made all the difference.”

Posted by Explore Deeply on Tuesday, June 16, 2015

The end of my work days are so much more rewarding these days.

I do not regret everything that has transpired to bring me to this place of Joy, Purpose, and Self Love. There is no more worthwhile journey than the one from your head to your heart. Once you get there, you know who you are. And that has made all the difference.

 

Bronnie Ware, a palliative nurse for 12 years, recorded the most common regrets of the dying and put her findings into a book called "The Top Five Regrets of The Dying."

Inspiration is my love.

My life so far has been one of contrasts and I have come out the other side smiling. More importantly, I have come through finally knowing how to love who I am and to help others learn to do the same.

We are all deserving of our own love. It also makes the world a much better place when we finally master this gift. Through many leaps of faith I have also learned that courage is always rewarded.
— Bronnie Ware
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